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Interesting info, as many of us take supplements (and are told to do so by various practitioners).  There are definitely a few in the "conflicting" territory that I swear by (cranberry for and to prevent UTIs, for instance, also GABA).  Others I totally agree are snake oil (glucosamine, any type of collagen replacement, etc.).  A large version of the chart can be found here.  What are your thoughts?  

 
 
Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility type: A characterization of the patients' lived experience.

Abstract:

Hypermobility type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS-HT) is an inherited connective tissue disorder clinically diagnosed by the presence of significant joint hypermobility and associated skin manifestations. This article presents a large-scale study that reports the lived experience of EDS-HT patients, the broad range of symptoms that individuals with EDS-HT experience, and the impact these symptoms have on daily functioning. A 237-item online survey, including validated questions regarding pain and depression, was developed. Four hundred sixty-six (466) adults (90% female, 52% college or higher degree) with a self-reported diagnosis of EDS-HT made in a clinic or hospital were included. The most frequently reported symptoms were joint pain (99%), hypermobility (99%), and limb pain (91%). They also reported a high frequency of other conditions including chronic fatigue (82%), anxiety (73%), depression (69%), and fibromyalgia (42%). Forty-six percent of respondents reported constant pain often described as aching and tiring/exhausting. Despite multiple interventions and therapies, many individuals (53%) indicated that their diagnosis negatively affected their ability to work or attend school. Our results show that individuals with EDS-HT can experience a wide array of symptoms and co-morbid conditions. The degree of constant pain and disability experienced by the majority of EDS-HT respondents is striking and illustrates the impact this disorder has on quality of life as well as the clinical challenges inherent in managing this complex connective tissue disorder.

PubMed info here.
 
 
Local anaesthetic failure in joint hypermobility syndrome

Summary:
When taking biopsies to assess skin strength in Ehlers–Danlos syndrome type III (EDS–III), a Danish group noticed that the patients experienced much pain despite conventional local anaesthesia.  When asked, all these patients reported previous experience of partial or complete failure of local anaesthesia in dental or obstetric procedures—for which reason some had been dismissed as hysterics.  Pursuing this finding, Arendt-Nielsen compared the effects of local anaesthesia in 8 patients with EDS–III and 8 controls.  Although the patients did gain analgesia from intradermal lidocaine the duration of effect was much shorter than in controls. EDS–III (now known as EDS–hypermobility type) is regarded by many authorities as identical to joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS).  We wish to draw attention to the possibility of resistance to local anaesthesia in individuals with this common and under-diagnosed condition.  Although the pathophysiology of this phenomenon remains unresolved, an important clue that a patient is at risk of local anaesthetic failure might be in front of our eyes.

Full text here.
 
 
Functional digestive symptoms and quality of life in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndromes: results of a national cohort study on 134 patients.


Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:  Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders. Gastrointestinal manifestations in EDS have been described but their frequency, nature and impact are poorly known. We aimed to assess digestive features in a national cohort of EDS patients.
METHODS:  A questionnaire has been sent to 212 EDS patients through the French patient support group, all of which had been formally diagnosed according to the Villefranche criteria. The questionnaire included questions about digestive functional symptoms, the GIQLI (Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index), KESS scoring system and the Rome III criteria.
RESULTS:  Overall, 135 patients (64% response rate) completed the questionnaire and 134 were analyzable (123 women; 91%). Mean age and Body Mass Index were respectively 35± 14.7 years and 24.3± 6.1 kg/m(2). The most common EDS subtype was hypermobility form (n=108; 80.6%). GIQLI and KESS median values were respectively 63.5 (27-117) and 19 [13.5-22]. Eighty four percent of patients had functional bowel disorders (FBD) according to the Rome III criteria.  An irritable bowel syndrome according to the same criteria was observed in 64 patients (48%) and 48 patients (36%) reported functional constipation. A gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) was reported in 90 patients (68.7%), significantly associated with a poorer GIQLI (60.5±16.8 versus 75.9±20.3; p<0.0001). GIQLI was also negatively impacted by the presence of an irritable bowel syndrome or functional constipation (p=0.007). There was a significant correlation between FBD and GERD.
CONCLUSIONS:  Natural frequency of gastrointestinal manifestations in EDS seems higher than previously assessed. FBD and GERD are very common in our study population, the largest ever published until now. Their impact is herein shown to be important. A systematic clinical assessment of digestive features should be recommended in EDS.



Full article here.
 
 
Symptom and joint mobility progression in the joint hypermobility syndrome (Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type).

Abstract
OBJECTIVES:  To evaluate progression of symptoms and joint mobility in the joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) in order to identify specific disease pictures by age at presentation.
METHODS:  Fifty JHS patients (44 females, 6 males) were evaluated by Beighton score (BS) calculation, and presence/absence and age at onset of 20 key symptoms. Incidence and prevalence rates by age at onset and sex were calculated and compared by chi-square, Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Relationship between BS and age at examination was evaluated by the Spearman rho correlation. The existence of an age cut-off separating patients with or without a positive BS was analysed by the receiver operating characteristic analysis. Influence of age on the single components of the BS was also investigated.
RESULTS:  Except for isolated features, the overall clinical presentation was the same between sexes. In the whole sample, statistically significant differences by age at presentation were registered for fatigue, myalgias, muscle cramps, strains/sprains, dislocations, tendon ruptures, tendonitis, gastroesophageal reflux, chronic gastritis, constipation/diarrhoea and abdominal hernias. A clear inverse correlation between age at examination and BS was demonstrated with an age cut-off fixed at 33 years. Among the components of the BS, spine and elbow joints were not significantly influenced by age.
CONCLUSIONS:  This study confirmed the existence of a protean clinical history of JHS which may be exemplified in different phases with distinguishable presentations. The knowledge of the peculiarities of each of them will help the practitioner in recognising and, hopefully, treating this condition.



PubMed info here.
 
 
Impairment and impact of pain in female patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a comparative study with fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis.

Abstract:
Objective:  The purpose of this study was to investigate functional impairment and the impact of pain in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT), and to compare the burden of disease with that in women with fibromyalgia (FM) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Results:  The study results showed clinically relevant health-related dysfunction in all groups. Significantly poorer physical, psychosocial, and overall function was found in the EDS-HT group compared with the RA group. In comparison with the FM group, the EDS-HT group reported similar physical and overall function, but better psychosocial function. T scores from the MPI revealed significantly higher levels of pain severity and life interference due to pain, and a lower level of perceived life control, in the EDS-HT group compared to the RA group. In contrast, the EDS-HT group showed significantly lower levels of pain severity, life interference, and affective distress in comparison with the FM group. Social support for help in coping with pain was similar between the 3 groups.
Conclusion:  EDS-HT is associated with a consistent burden of disease, similar to that of FM and worse than that of RA, as well as a broad impact of chronic pain on daily life, which needs to be addressed in the health care system.



Full text here.
 
 
Dysphagia in patients with the joint hypermobility syndrome


Abstract:Results: 17 patients with JHS and dysphagia were referred by the rheumatologists to our unit in 1 year: 76% female; age range: 12–58. None had evidence of a structural cause for the dysphagia on either gastroscopy or barium studies. 10 (59%) had an oesophageal dysmotility to account for their dysphagia – out of these one had achalasia; the other 9 (53%) had oesophageal hypomotility with 7 having frequent hypotensive peristalsis and 2 having intermittent hypotensive peristalsis. 33% of those with hypomotility had a normal Multiple Rapid Swallow test (MRS). 7 of the 17 patients (41%) had normal oesophageal motility and 6 of these had reflux studies: 50% had GOR, 17% had a hypersensitive oesophagus and the remaining 33% had normal studies. Only 2 patients (12%) had hiatus hernias and both of these had oesophageal hypomotility and no GOR.

Conclusion: This is the first study of upper GI physiology in patients with JHS and non-structural dysphagia. Oesophageal hypomotility is common in these patients and those patients with normal MRS are likely to show the best response to prokinetics. 50% of those with normal motility had pathological GOR and would benefit from high dose proton pump inhibitor therapy. The remainder had normal studies, suggesting hypersensitivity which may respond to treatment with neuromodulators such as amitriptyline. Only 12% of patients had a hiatus hernia, which is in contrast to previous studies.3 Further prospective studies are required to understand the pathophysiology and management options for dysphagia in JHS.



Text here.
 
 
Management of pain and fatigue in the joint hypermobility syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type): principles and proposal for a multidisciplinary approach.


Abstract:
Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) hypermobility type (EDS-HT), is a underdiagnosed heritable connective tissue disorder characterized by generalized joint hypermobility and a wide range of visceral, pelvic, neurologic, and cognitive dysfunctions. Deterioration of quality of life is mainly associated with pain and fatigue. Except for the recognized effectiveness of physiotherapy for some musculoskeletal features, there are no standardized guidelines for the assessment and treatment of pain and fatigue. In this work, a practical classification of pain presentations and factors contributing in generating painful sensations in JHS/EDS-HT is proposed. Pain can be topographically classified in articular limb (acute/subacute and chronic), muscular limb (myofascial and fibromyalgia), neuropathic limb, back/neck, abdominal and pelvic pain, and headache. For selected forms of pain, specific predisposing characteristics are outlined. Fatigue appears as the result of multiple factors, including muscle weakness, respiratory insufficiency, unrefreshing sleep, dysautonomia, intestinal malabsorption, reactive depression/anxiety, and excessive use of analgesics.  A set of lifestyle recommendations to instruct patients as well as specific investigations aimed at characterizing pain and fatigue are identified. Available treatment options are discussed in the set of a structured multidisciplinary approach based on reliable outcome tools.



Full article here.
 
 
Use of the Gait Profile Score for the evaluation of patients with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type.

Abstract:
Gait analysis (GA) is widely used for clinical evaluations in various pathological states, both in children and in adults, such as in patients with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT). Otherwise, GA produces a large volume of data and there is the clinical need to provide also a quantitative measure of the patient's overall gait. Starting from this aim some global indexes were proposed by literature as a summary measure of the patient's gait, such as the Gait Profile Score (GPS). While validity of the GPS was demonstrated for the evaluation of the functional limitation of children with Cerebral Palsy, no studies have been conducted in patients JHS/EDS-HT. The aim of our study was therefore to investigate the effectiveness of the GPS in the quantification of functional limitation of patients with JHS/EDS-HT. Twenty-one adult (age: 36.1±12.7 years) individuals with JHS/EDS-HT were evaluated using GA and from GA data the GPS was computed. The results evidenced that the GPS value of patients was 8.9±2.6, statistically different from 4.6±0.9 displayed by the control group. In particular, all values of Gait Variable Scores (GVS) which compose the GPS were higher if compared to controls, with the exception of Pelvic Tilt and Foot Progression. The correlations between GPS/GVS and Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) showed significant relationship between GPS and the item 11 ("Walking 2 blocks") (ρ=-0.56; p<0.05) and 12 ("Walking a mile") of LEFS (ρ=-0.76; p<0.05). Our results showed that GPS and GVS seem to be appropriate outcome measures for the evaluation of the functional limitation during gait of patients with JHS/EDS-HT.



PubMed info here.

 
 
Belgium doctors researching ACL tears found a previously unknown ligament, the anterolateral ligament (ALL), in human knees.  Article here.